Yes, I said windfall. First it was daycare expenses, then traveling sports teams, tutors, computers and clothes. Finally it was time for the big expense. College. Wondering if you will ever retire? You are not alone.

The Baby Boomers are in a different place than previous generations. Families are attempting to save for retirement while dealing with exorbitant college costs, as well as the challenges (sometimes financial) of aging parents. This is coupled with trying to save for their own retirement, which unlike previous generations does not include a pension.

While this is a big dilemma for most couples, I focus on the absolutes.

Where you cannot impact change:

  • Cost of college and that you did or didn’t save enough for the expenses.
  • Developing issues with aging parents.
  • The downturn in the financial markets.
  • How much you have saved previously for retirement.

What you can impact:

  • How much debt you will personally take on to pay for college.
  • Children’s college choice.
  • What you can afford to do for take care of parents.
  • How you can load up your retirement savings once college is over.

These items, taken one by one are manageable. I am going to focus on the last one. How you can capture the true windfall available when the kids are out of college.

In order to put junior through college you’ve paired down on your own expenses, creating a lower sustainable living expense or developing a reduced budget. Once college is over if you continue to live at this lower sustainable living expense you can put all the savings you were putting towards college into your retirement savings.

  •  Junior’s college cost – $40,000
  • Junior’s financial aide – $20,000
  • Your contribution – $20,000

 Post college add this extra $20,000 to your existing retirement savings and suddenly you have a windfall. In five years you will have put away an extra $100,000. If you were contributing $30,000 a year that number jumps to $150,000. 

This opportunity for extra savings works because you are taking the discipline utilized to pay for college expenses to pay yourself for retirement. If you are not maximizing your 401(k), 403(b) or other employer-sponsored tax-deferred retirement accounts you have another bonus awaiting you. Now you can afford to maximize your 401(k) at a$16,500 maximum this year for those under age 50 and $22,000 for those over 50. This will reduce your overall taxable income and lower your taxes. 

If your 401(k) contribution is now $10,000 larger for your family in the 28% tax bracket, this represents a $2,800 reduction in taxes.  

Saving more and reducing your taxes. It’s a win-win windfall. 

Advisory Services offered through Axiom Advisors, LLC. A registered Investment Advisor Securities offered through Cambridge Investment Research, Inc. a Broker/Dealer member FINRA/SIPC Axiom Advisors, LLC and Cambridge Investment Research, Inc. are not affiliated.